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Photo of Black Lion
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Real Ale

Long Melford Black Lion

previously known as Lion

The Green, CO10 9DN

01787 312356


grid reference TL 864 465

opened 1830 circa

owner Free House

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hotel

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opening hours:

  • 9-11;
  • 10-10.30 (Sun)
(Times last updated 28/07/2009)

regular real ales

Adnams Bitter + Broadside


listed building grade II


View in Google Earth
Local licensing authority for Long Melford is Babergh

CAMRA West Suffolk & Borders branch.



last updated 19/05/2016

Georgian Hotel (10 letting rooms) overlooking the famous huge village green and close to church. Close to Melford hall (National Trust) and Kentwell Hall.

Beer served through handpulls Beer served through handpulls

Lunchtime meals (not just snacks) Lunchtime meals (not just snacks)

Evening meals Evening meals

Restaurant or separate dining area Restaurant or separate dining area

Separate public bar Separate public bar

Traditional pub games available Traditional pub games available

Real fire Real fire

dogs-welcome Dog friendly

children-welcome Family friendly

Accommodation available Accommodation available

Bus stop Bus stop nearby (see public transport tab for details)

station 4.00 miles away Railway station about 4.00 miles away (see public transport tab for details)

parking parking

Beer garden or other outside drinking area Beer garden or other outside drinking area


(Most pub, location & historic details collated by Nigel, Tony or Keith - original sources are credited)

(some old PO directory information courtesy of londonpublichouse.com)

(** historic newspaper information from Stuart Ansell)

(*** historic newspaper information from Bob Mitchell)

Old picture from http://www.foxearth.org.uk


Note

The black lion is a heraldic sign mainly related to either Queen Philippa of Hainault - wife of Edward III and a popular 14th cent. queen who was married for over 40 years. Or it may be a reference to Owain Glyndwr - the celebrated 14th cent. Welsh chieftain.